Tag Archives: MDGs

Rewarding Education Initiatives

2 Oct

Iduka is an organisation proud to push for more post-secondary school opportunities throughout the entirety of Africa. After all, education means empowerment and the chance to increase ones own quality of life. Iduka’s “LinkedIn® Challenge” Scholarship is the latest opportunity Iduka offers to motivated individuals. But of course Iduka does not for one minute take for granted that primary and secondary schools must also have opportunities in abundance if Africa’s youth are to flourish.

 The Commonwealth Education Good Practice Awards (to be held in August 2012) provide an excellent chance to recognise and reward innovate education practices in primary and secondary education. The deadline for the tri-annual competition is fast approaching (30 November 2011) and entrants in previous years have come from far across the Commonwealth. To qualify, the entrant education practice must have addressed at least one of eight action points:

  • Achieving universal primary education
  • Eliminating gender inequalities in education
  • Improving quality in education
  • Using distance learning to overcome barriers
  • Supporting education in difficult circumstances
  • Mitigating the impact of HIV on education systems
  • Using education to promote sustainable development
  • Promoting civil paths to peace.

 

Commonwealth Flag

So many schools, projects, and non-profit organisations across Africa do such fantastic work in primary and secondary education. At the last competition in 2009 the victors were from Malaysia, this year let us hope that African endeavours are well-represented. Good luck to all those organisations that enter, without all of their hard work Iduka would face an even harder uphill struggle. For more information on the competition, visit allafrica.

 

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Namibia: The High Cost of Education

7 Sep

A recent article by allafrica has highlighted a significant stumbling block in Namibia (and Africa’s) wider goal to tackle illiteracy and poverty; namely, that the cost of education is too much for many people to afford.

High school costs means fewer pupils can attend lessons.

Maurus Nekaro, the Governor of Kavango Region in Namibia, spoke of how education costs are far too high to be inclusive. Nekaro also pointed to the importance of incorporating media and communications technologies into education in order to enhance studies and facilitate rapid progress. Of course, such technologies cost money and, with fees already on the rise, would such proposals further inhibit the affordability of education?

Nekaro’s comments come at the same time as another headline: tuition and hostel fees at the Polytechnic of Namibia are to rise by 7% and 10% respectively from early next year. Such an increment has enraged the Student’s Representative Council who believe they will see no improvement in the quality of services at the Poly. Members of the Student’s Representative Council have already complained of small classrooms and overcrowding. With the cost of education set to soar in Namibia, questions arise as to how this will affect wider access to post-secondary education in the country. In order to tackle illiteracy and poverty, affordable education must be a higher priority.

 

Photo credit: Caitlin Heller, Wikipedia

Jolandie’s Progress: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

28 Aug

Although I have been a little quiet on the blog front of late, that is not to say that Jolandie’s travels have not progressed. It has certainly been an eventful month, and below is the latest post from Jolandie’s friend Hanret (with some rather upsetting news)…

Jolandie contemplating the road ahead

” Getting ready for my daily walk in the park with Jolandie’s favourite hound this morning, we were chatting about the night that was and the day ahead. She wasn’t feeling great – she’s fighting an awful cold and had a restless night. However, she was up and going and had already passed N’zeto!

And then I got the message I had always been dreading. Funny, I was never concerned about Jolandie being abducted or taken hostage or anything like that. Not only because of the excellent tactical training she received from Tacmo, but also because of who she is.

She is incredibly level-headed, she always remains calm, she is brilliant at thinking on her feet and she has a mental fortitude way beyond her years. I always felt that she would cope better than most in a sticky situation.

However, I always feared most for Luna’s safety. I forever implored her to tie a piece of string to Luna and to her wrist when sleeping in her tent out in the open!! But I somehow never thought Jolandie and Luna would be parted the way they were today.

There she was, coughing and cycling along when she heard a vehicle coming up from behind and slowing down. Nothing unusual about this – well-wishers and good Samaritans do this all the time. A black Ford ‘bakkie’ (small truck thingy for the non-South Africans) with four youths pulled up alongside her.

They motioned for her to get off her bike, laughing and joking. Jolandie thought they were inebriated and at first thought it all a joke. But when they got out of the ‘bakkie’, flashing knives and pangas, she knew it was no joke, though they were still laughing.

Quick thinking Jolandie said she wanted to keep her handlebar pannier as she had food in it. There was some food in it, but also her passport and money! And she also took her one front pannier – the one with her toiletries in!! What a girl!! Have passport, money, food and toiletries – can travel!! Good thinking!!

When the ‘bakkie’ with the laughing, inebriated youths and Luna disappeared over the horizon, Jolandie realised it wasn’t just a prank. This was for real.

She started making her way back to N’zeto on foot, feeling vulnerable and shaken. Hvir and I were pacing up and down because Jolandie was in an area where the cell phone reception was exceptionally bad and I couldn’t get hold of her to talk to her. I had to rely on the odd message she managed to send when there was a bit of a signal.

Werner, one of her friends in Lobito contacted someone in Soyo who doesn’t know Jolandie from a bar of soap, but he immediately started driving to N’zeto. Between Candido, her hosts in Luanda and Pedro, her contact at Hoteis Angola – her kind and generous sponsors in Angola – the Zaire province police commander was contacted and the N’zeto police was sent looking for her.

Now, and this is the part where all South African’s jaws will drop, not one but TWO helicopters were dispatched from Luanda to go and look for the perpetrators AND road blocks were immediately set up on all roads leading north looking for Luna!!! And by all accounts, if the perpetrators do get caught, they’ll sober up VERY quickly, lose their smiles and probably some other body parts too!!

Shortly after Jolandie and Luna were separated

Oh, and it only gets better! Back in N’zeto Jolandie was interrogated by about 30 police officers, wanting every bit of detail of the youngsters and then she was taken to a hotel and two guards were placed outside her door!! She said it felt as if she was in a witness protection program!! The governor of the Zaire province was notified of the situation. He hopped into his Lear Jet (OK, I’m getting carried away and am exaggerating – it was a Cessna, but still!!) and flew to N’zeto, picked Jolandie up and flew her back to his personal residence in M’banza Congo!!!!! Here a doctor was summoned to examine her and he gave her loads of vitamins and tablets for pain and fever!! (It did occur to me that a traditional healer may be called upon and that he may arrive with rabbit feet and hen’s teeth, but then I live in a different part of Africa – clearly!!)

Jolandie will be staying with the governor for the next two days while the search for Luna continues!! And while she recovers from her dreadful cold!!

I am truly and utterly stunned, amazed and humbled by the generosity, kindness, love and gentleness that is being bestowed upon her by so many, until recently, complete strangers in a foreign country. And so incredibly saddened that ‘them criminals, they are everywhere’.

I know I speak for Jolandie when I thank everybody, the incredible people in Angola, the wonderful facebook friends and many others who have been sending good wishes and support. You guys are all awesome and without people like you in her life, none of this would have been possible.

I’m very pleased that Jolandie has a warm bed to sleep in tonight and is being taken care of, but feel sorry for Luna who is with unkind and malicious strangers!!

But Angola seems to be the country of miracles and it would not surprise me in the slightest if I’ll be sitting at my computer in the early hours of tomorrow morning informing you that Luna has been found!!

Tonight I would not only like to thank Hoteis Angola for their incredibly generous financial sponsorship, but also for pulling out all the stops today to take care of Jolandie today. What an example of what sponsorship is all about!!

I have had many messages from people offering to help. If you want to help financially, please visit Jolandie’s SPONSOR A COUNTRY page. You can make donations via PayPal or directly to her bank account. And thank you so much!”

Happier times with Luna

Good Samaritans, friendly goats, and reaching Angola

1 Aug

26th July:

I have been cycling for 11 days solid now. No rest days. I just simply can’t afford to take a rest day. The time limit on my Angolan visa puts me under enormous pressure. So I simply have to push on. We (Hanret and I) have worked out that I have to maintain a minimum daily average of 70km, and I can only afford 3 rest days! That’s only 3 rest days from Windhoek all the way to the DRC!!!

On my way from Windhoek to the Angolan border, I have experienced immense kindness! FNB Namibia has helped, not only financially (by sponsoring the Namibia leg of my trip), but the staff at branches on my way North have welcomed me with open arms! Helping me with organising sponsored accommodation, taking me out to dinner, making me feel welcome! I have also experienced kindness from strangers on the road. Like Terry, who I met on my way to Otjiwarongo. Terry drove 70km that evening to fetch me so that I wouldn’t have to sleep next to the road! And then there’s the family who gave me N$100 at a picnic spot on my way to Oshivelo! Strangers who have given me shelter and even offered their own beds for me to sleep in! I have given motivational talks at a number of schools in Namibia, as well as to FNB staff at some of the branches on my route going North! The responses have been amazing and I feel so priviledged for the opportunities given to me to share my story!

From Oshivelo onward it became a very different ball game! I had been told that 80% of Namibia’s population resides in the North. Meaning: that I would now start to see more and more people! At Oshivelo I went through a control post. Here I got shouted at for attempting to take a photo! Then I had a group of kids surround me and chant: “Miss, miss, give me one dollar”. After that things got better though. I did see more and more people! Mostly friendly. People would wave and greet me with big smiles as I pass them by. Some would just stare with confusion written all over their faces. Even the goats would run up to the road and bleat at me in greeting!! (I kid you not!!) Halfway between Oshivelo and Ondangwa I spent the night sleeping next to the road. No problems whatsoever! And now I find myself sitting just a few hundred meters from the Angolan border!

Oshikango is a chaotic town! I picked up a tail about 10km from town (local boys riding in my slip stream). In return for my hard work, one of them had to guide me around. I cannot adequitely describe what it is like riding into this town on a bicycle! People shouting at you from all directions in Portuguese, English, Afrikaans, and other local dialects. It feels like there are millions of people here! Even had my first Portuguese conversation! Yay! Staying at Piscas tonight, for free! Had pizza as my last meal in Namibia! Tomorrow morning I cross the border and say: BOM DIA ANGOLA! 🙂

Last night in Namibia!

Farewell My South Africa – Again!

11 Jul

The road calls! And so I go.

I will be back in Namibia by tonight!
The time I have had to spend with my nearest and dearest at home, has been a true blessing.
But now I really need to get a move on. The time restrictions that my visas for Angola, DRC and Congo place on me, will force me to have to push really hard for the next few months. I have to uphold a daily average of at least 75 kilometers, or else I won’t make it to each border in time.

Back to Luna in Namibia!

Whilst on the road, it is not always possible for me to update my blog on a regular basis.

Hanret Snyman, one of my nearest and dearest friends, has been my ‘ground control’ support whilst on the road and the person who I am in constant contact with. (Also the person that puts in an amazing amount of effort behind the scenes in helping me live my dream). She will be posting regular updates when I am not able to.

So be on the lookout for updates from “La Domestique“.

Be sure to listen in on JacarandaFM every Thursday for LIVE updates! (I will send out a notification as to what time)

And if you’d like to get involved and sponsor a country: Click here for more information.

A big thank you to FNB Namibia for sponsoring the Namibia leg of my trip!!!

Back to Windhoek!!

6 Jul

FINALLY!!!

I will be flying back to Windhoek on Tuesday, 12 July!
I hope to be back on the road, officially, by latest Friday – 15 July.
That gives me little over a week to make it to the Angolan border, then a month to get through Angola.

So you can expect more ‘exciting’ updates pretty soon!!

“The road calls”

In the meantime, check out an article about my trip on Jacaranda FM!! There’s an audio interview as well that you can listen to.

I had a meeting on Monday with Managing Editor, Denzil Taylor, at Jacaranda FM. I’m very happy to announce that they have come on board in a big way!
Now you’ll be able to listen in LIVE for weekly updates. I’ll be chatting to the team every week to keep you all updated on where I am and how things are going.

A big thank you and a very warm welcome to the Jacaranda FM team!

I’ll post an update as soon as we’ve sorted out the more ‘nitty-gritty’ details.

In the meantime: Check out their Website.

2 Down – 1 To Go

27 Jun

The long awaited Angolan visa!

Okay, I now have a visa for Angola that is valid until the 24th August and a visa for the D.R.C, which is valid until the 7th September. I picked up my passport from the Embassy of DRC in Pretoria this morning and went straight to the Congo embassy, a few blocks down, and handed in my application. My visa for Congo will be ready on Thursday! So….I should be back in Windhoek by this coming weekend!

And today marks 2 months on this journey!  Here’s a little video to celebrate…

 

Angola – Mapping the Country’s Education System

21 Jun

So, after a rollercoaster few weeks Jolandie has finally got her Angolan visa and is about to set off on her Cycle For Education Tour of the country. But just what can she expect education-wise?

Flag of Angola

The country gained independence in 1975, but experienced intense civil war from 1975 – 2002. Since the closure of that period, Angola has looked towards stability and rebuilding the shattered education system. There is now compulsory, free primary school education for children in Angola for the first four years (which begins at the age of 6 or 7). Primary school then lasts for another four years and secondary school education follows immediately afterwards. In 2000 this system was classed as severely sub-standard with over half of adults classified as illiterate. The Angolan government has since concentrated on shifting that situation for the betterment of the people. Education reform started in 2004, and by 2008 over 80% of students had been integrated into the new system.*

The Ministry of Education is based in Luanda, and in 2009 this Ministry made an agreement (with UNICEF) to provide quality education training to 8,750 primary school teachers over the course of three years.** In addition, just yesterday, allafrica.com reported that over 1500 adults of the Chicomba district have been attending the second phase of a programme designed to fight illiteracy. Since the beginning of the programme, 6,500 adults have been taught to read and write.

Luanda, Angola's capital city.

But what about post-secondary education? There has been considerable development in post-secondary education over the last few decades. Just after independence, the public Universidade Agostinho Neto (UAN) was established, and shortly afterwards came Universidade Católica de Angola (UCAN). A wave of political liberalisation in the 1990s saw the growth of many private universities, some of which were directly linked to Portugal. In 2010 the UAN split up, with various faculties now constituting autonomous public universities (two have retained the UAN name). Pupils hoping to continue to university level are now required to undergo a post-secondary, “pre-university” 2-3 year course.***

A class in Kuito...

Although great progress clearly has been made in the country, there are still many challenges ahead. Primary school enrollment is at an all time high, however drop out rates keep increasing. Around 20% of males and 45% of females are still illiterate, despite the programmes implemented to directly tackle this problem***. The solution is not a short-term one but the focus on education is clearly present – I’m sure Jolandie will have personal insight into this situation once she gets back on the road.

 Sources:

* i4donline.net.

** UNICEF.org

*** angola-today.com

Image of Luanda… Photo: Silje L. Bakke, Wikipedia.org

Image of schoolchildren… Photo: Living in Kuito, Wikipedia.org

 

 

News in Nigeria: Foundation describes the condition of Edo State education as ‘deplorable’.

21 Jun

Edo State, Nigeria

Last Friday the TY Danjuma Foundation declared that the state of education in this region was alarming, despite huge infrastructural investment in the education sector. The TY Danjuma Foundation attributed the problem to an imbalance in the posting of teachers, and the poor construction of school buildings in rural and urban areas. In rural areas, the student-teacher ratio was found to be 160 pupils to 1 teacher, whilst in urban areas it was found to be 50 to 1. Although this indicates that there are more teachers in urban areas, there is a class size problem that desperately needs addressing. An oversized class means that not all of the children have fair access to the limited resources. Children that may initially struggle through classes do not get the one-on-one teacher care that their education requires, and they will become despondent with the system. Few pupils in class sizes this large have aspirations of higher education, and they fail to reach their full potential.

Moreover, the investigation discovered that secondary schools were woefully under-funded. Without resources, pupils cannot better themselves. There is no reading without books; there is no writing without pencils and paper. Such a situation means that secondary-school graduation rates remain low – further hampering opportunities for pupils to continue to post-secondary education. The TY Danjuuma Foundation have sponsored the Wing Community Development Project, which has supported over 2000 pupils through secondary and tertiary education – but there is still a long way to go, and the momentum must come from the state.

 

News Source: allafrica.com

Image Source: Uwe Dedering, Wikipedia.org

Angolan Visa Application Accepted!!!

20 Jun

Wooooohhhhooooooo!!! FINALLY!!! My visa application for Angola got accepted last Tuesday!
Now I feel like I’m (almost) back in the game again. For a moment there I felt like a spider floating in space…disconnected from my web.
Soon enough I’ll be back on the road again!! Yay! I am very excited to hit the open road again. Visa processing time is usually ten days so I should have it any day now. Fantastic!

On Tuesday I actually had some fun at the Consulate. I mean, it’s not like the first time I have spoken or seen these people. The woman that was assisting me (very friendly and helpful), disappeared with my documentation through a door to the back. On her return she was accompanied by the Head of Consulate (who can’t speak a word of english), with my mission letter in his hands. He looked at me and spoke really fast…all in Portuguese. I just smiled at him. The woman assisting me then told him that I do not speak Portuguese. He pointed at my date of birth on my visa application form. Then looked back up at me and stared at me, for what seemed like, the longest five seconds of my life. “What has my age got to do with anything”, I thought to myself??
He then gave me a broad smile and said something else in Portuguese, gesturing with his hands like saying: “Come on in”. The woman assisting me now played the role of translator and said: “He says: You are welcome to Angola”.

Fabulous! Muito Obrigada!!
The Head of Consulate then proceeded to tell all and sundry in the office about me and what I am planning on doing. I had to show them my route on a big map on the wall. One of the women said: “I’ll follow you on a scooter”. LoL. Great, now they’re even rallying for back-up!
I can only hope that future encounters on the visa application front will be like today’s.

Jolandie relaxing with friends, before the big journey kicks off again

What happens now?
Once I have my visa (which seems like it might be early this week), I’ll be on a plane back to Windhoek and my faithful bike Luna. I then have some Social Responsibility to take care of in Windhoek.
First National Bank, Namibia, is sponsoring the Namibian leg of my journey. In return I will be giving motivational talks at ten schools on my route. Four in Windhoek, six on my way North to the Angolan border. (Primary Schools)

I then have 30 days to make it to the Angola/DRC border, seeing as my Angolan visa is only valid for that period of time.
The break that I’ve had now (More than 2 weeks already), has also broken my momentum. I suspect I’ll have to build it up again. But not too worried about that. Keeping in mind that the roads have been superb thusfar. Once I enter Angola, it’ll be a very different story!

The adventure awaits!!

*Thank you to all the people who have jumped in and helped with: attaining letters of invitation, translating documentation etc. And to the staff at the Angolan Consulate in Johannesburg today. Because of you, I now can’t wait to enter Angola!*

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